Faculty

Affiliated Faculty

Porter Abbott
Ph.D., University of Toronto
Professor Emeritus, English Department
Areas of interest include narrative, nineteenth and twentieth-century literature, autobiography, modernism, cognition, evolution.

Steve Allaback
Ph.D., University of Washington
Professor Emeritus, English Department
Areas of interest include The Novel, American Literature, and Writing of Fiction.

Sylvia Bermudez
Ph.D., University of Southern California
Professor, Spanish Portuguese Department
Areas of interest include Twentieth-Century Peninsular and Latin American poetry and poetics; literary and cultural theory; Galician poetry popular culture.

Sheridan Blau
Ph.D., Brandeis University
Professor Emeritus, English Department
Areas of interest include Seventeenth Century Literature, Rhetoric and Composition, English Education.

Maurizia Boscagli
Ph.D., Brown University
Associate Professor, English Department
Areas of interest include gender studies and feminist theory, the body, theories of subjectivity, British and European modernism, Fin-de-siècle literature, critical and cultural theory, and theories of mass culture.

Cynthia J. Brown
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley
Professor, French and Italian Department
Areas of interest include Medieval literature, late Medieval poetry, the transition from manuscript to print culture, and the book as cultural artifact.

Elliot Butler-Evans
Ph.D., University of California, Santa Cruz
Professor Emeritus, English Department
Areas of interest include Modern American fiction, African American and other ethnic literatures, Marxist cultural theory, narrative theory and social semiotics, and gender and sexuality.

Leo Cabranes-Grant
Ph.D., Harvard University
Associate Professor, Theater and Dance Department
Areas of interest include Spanish and Latin-American drama and theatre history and “minority” theatre. Leo Cabranes-Grant is also a playwright and director.

Joao Camilo Dos Santos
Ph.D., University of Huate-Bretagne
Professor, Center for Portuguese Studies
Portuguese and Brazilian literatures; nineteenth and twentieth centuries; “neo-realismo”; literary theory; analysis and criticism of narrative, poetry, and drama. Responsible for the publication series of the Center for Portuguese Studies; founder and editor of its yearly journal, Santa Barbara Portuguese Studies.

Julie Carlson
Ph.D., University of Chicago
Professor, English Department
Areas of interest include British Romanticism, feminist and queer theories, early nineteenth-century British theater, and the social revolutions of the 1790’s and 1960’s.

Jorge Luis Castillo
Ph.D., Harvard University
Associate Professor, Spanish Portuguese Department
Areas of instruction and research: Nineteenth and early twentieth-century Spanish-American literature. Special focus on Romanticism, Modernismo, and the Spanish-American Avant-garde. Additional areas of interest: poetry and poetics; history of ideas; contemporary literary theory; Cuban and Puertorrican literature; nineteenth century Peninsular and contemporary Spanish-American literature.

Jorge Checa
Ph.D., Princeton University
Professor, Spanish Portuguese Department
Early Modern Literature and Culture. He is the author of Gracián y la imaginación arquitectónica (1986) Barroco esencial (1992), Experiencia y representación en el Siglo de Oro (1998) , and two books on Spanish Golden Age Poetry. His publications also include a number of articles about Gracián, Cervantes, Colonial Literature, Lope de Vega, Quevedo etc., as well as other topics related to literary history (Golden Age, Medieval, Contemporary). He has applied comparative approaches to the study of Golden Age authors, and has written about different theoretical issues such as intertextuality, reading and interpretation, ideology, or the relations between literature and other forms of representation.

Elizabeth Heckendorn Cook
Ph.D., Comparative Literature, Stanford University
Associate Professor, English Department
Areas of interest include eighteenth-century British and French literature and cultural studies.

Antonio Cortijo Ocana
Ph.D., University of California Berkeley
Associate Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese
Author of over 50 professional articles and 13 books on Medieval and Renaissance Romance Literatures, Spanish Colonial literature, Medieval and Modern History, and Contemporary Spanish and Spanish American literature.

Jean-Jacques Courtine
Doctorat d’Etat de Linguistique, Paris X-Nanterre
Professor and Undergraduate Advisor, French and Italian Department
Areas of interest include linguistics and cultural studies, discourse analysis, and history of the body and of mentalities.

Susan Derwin
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University
Associate Professor, Department of Germanic, Slavic and Semitic Studies
Areas of interest include holocaust studies and nineteenth and twentieth-century narrative, with an emphasis on the European novel and the personal memoir.

Enda Duffy
Ph.D., Harvard University
Professor, English Department
Areas of interest include post-colonial literatures and cultures, Irish literature, modernism and postmodernisn, cultural studies, and Joyce.

Francis M. Dunn
Ph.D., Yale University
Associate Professor and Chair, Classics Department
Areas of interest include Greek drama, Augustan poetry, and narrative theory. His publications include Tragedy’s End: Closure and Innovation in Euripidean Drama (Oxford 1996).

Ron Egan
Ph.D., Harvard University
Professor, Department Chair and Graduate Advisor, East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies
Ronald Egan works on traditional Chinese poetry, aesthetics, and literati culture of the Tang and Song periods. His publications include studies of major writers of the period as well as topical studies on literature, literary criticism and the relation between poetry and the other arts (painting, calligraphy and music). He is also the translator of selected essays of Qian Zhongshu, one of twentieth-century China’s foremost literary scholars. His current work is on the problem of justifying interest in beauty and aesthetic pursuits in Song dynasty China in such diverse fields as poetics, horticulture, the collection of art objects and antiquities, and entertainment songs. Before coming to UCSB, he taught at Harvard University and Wellesley College. He has received grants from the American Council of Learned Societies and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Jody Enders
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania
Professor, French and Italian, Theater and Dance
Areas of interest include Medieval literature, history of rhetoric, performance theory, and the interrelations in law and literature.

Robert A. Erickson
Ph.D., Yale University
Professor Emeritus, English Department
Areas of interest include seventeenth and eighteenth-century English literature, literature and religion, and literature and medicine.

L. O. Aranye Fradenburg
Ph.D., University of Virginia
Professor, English Department
Areas of interest include Medieval English and Scottish literature, critical theory, gender and sexualities, and public humanites.

Victor Fuentes
Ph.D., University of New York
Professor Emeritus, Department of Spanish and Portuguese
Nineteenth and Twentieth century Spanish literature; Spanish and Latin American avant-garde, postmodernism, film and theater; literary and cultural criticism.

Patricia Fumerton
Ph.D., Stanford University
Professor, English Department
Areas of interest include sixteenth and seventeenth-century culture and literature, Sidney, Spenser, Jonson, high and low subjectivity, vagrancy and spatial mobility, and popular broadsides.

Giles Gunn
Ph.D., University of Chicago
Professor, English Department
Areas of interest include American literary and cultural studies, global studies, literary theory and criticism, and American intellectual and religious studies.

Carl Gutierrez-Jones
Ph.D., Cornell University
Professor, English Department
Areas of interest include contemporary American fiction, critical race studies, Chicano studies, and literature of the Americas.

Yunte Huang
Ph.D., SUNY Buffalo
Professor, English Department
20th-century American poetry, modernism, Asian American literature, transpacific literature, and translation.

William Davies King
D.F.A. in Dramatic Theory and Criticism, Yale School of Drama
Professor and Graduate Advisor, Theater and Dance
Areas of interest include theater history, dramatic theory, and dramatic literature, specializing in English and American, as well as ancient Greek drama, ranging from melodrama to avant-garde performance, from the classic or canonical to the utterly obscure and subversive. He is currently at work on a book about Agnes Boulton and a study of the portrayal of darkness and sixth sense on the nineteenth-century English stage, encompassing performances of mesmerism, spiritualism, and science, as well as drama.

Wolf Kittler
Ph.D., University of Erlangen-Nürnberg; Habilitation, University of Freiburg
Professor, Department of Germanic, Slavic and Semitic Studies
Areas of interest include include western literature from Greek antiquity to the present, philosophy, art history, history of science, media technology, and critical theory.

Stephanie LeMenager
Ph.D., Harvard University
Associate Professor, English Department
Areas of interest include nineteenth and twentieth- century American literature and cultures, literatures of the North American West, environmental theories and representations, and rhetorics of slavery and freedom.

Suzanne Jill Levine
Ph.D., New York University
Professor, Spanish and Portuguese Department
Areas of interest include Latin American literature; twentieth century fiction; literary translation and theory; comparative literary studies. Author of El espejo hablado: un estudio de Cien años de soledad (Caracas: Monte Avila, 1975), Guía de Bioy Casares (Madrid: Fundamentos, 1982), The Subversive Scribe: Translating Latin American Fiction (St. Paul: Graywolf Press, 1991); Manuel Puig and the Spider Woman: His Life and Fictions (New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux; London: Faber & Faber, 2000), as well as numerous articles, chapters, interviews, reviews and creative translations. Her work on major Latin American and Hispanic writers includes pieces on Jorge Luis Borges, Adolfo Bioy Casares, Guillermo Cabrera Infante, Julio Cortazar, Jose Donoso, Carlos Fuentes, Silvina Ocampo, Alejandra Pizarnik, Julian Rios and Severo Sarduy. Suzanne Jill Levine’s honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship (1996), the PEN American Award for Career Achievement in Hispanic Studies (1996), and several grants and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Sydney Lévy
Ph.D., University of California, Irvine
Professor Emeritus, French and Italian Department
Vice-Chair and Graduate Advisor, Comparative Literature
Areas of interest include contemporary poetry, literary theory, fantastic literature, and science and literature.

Shirley Geok-Lin Lim
Ph.D., Brandeis University
Professor, English Department
Areas of interest include Asian American literature, post-colonial literature, ethnic and feminist writing, and creative writing.

Sara H. Lindheim
Ph.D., Brown University
Associate Professor, Classics Department
Areas of interest include Latin poetry, Sappho, and critical and feminist theory. Her publications include Mail and Female: Epistolary Narrative and Desire in Ovid’s Heroides (forthcoming).

Alan Liu
Ph.D., Stanford University
Professor, English Department
Areas of interest include literature, new media, and information culture, British Romantic literature and art, and literary and cultural theory (especially formalism, cultural criticism, post-industrialism).

Suzanne Jill Levine
Ph.D., New York University
Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese
Latin American literature; twentieth century fiction; literary translation and theory; comparative literary studies.

Francisco A. Lomeli
Ph.D., University of New Mexico
Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese
Latin American literature, particularly Chilean, Andean, Mexican, and Argentine; Central American Literature; testimonial literature; translation; Chicano literature, particularly Southwest literary history, Pre-Chicano literature; literary theory; cultural studies; autobiography; bibliography.

Didier Maleuvre
Ph.D., Yale University
Professor, French and Italian Department
Areas of interest include nineteenth and twentieth-century literature; aesthetic theory, philosophy, and the history of art.

David Marshall
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University
Professor, English Department, Comparative Literature, Executive Dean, Humanities and Fine Arts, College of Letters and Science
Areas of interest include eighteenth-century fiction and aesthetics, narrative theory, Shakespeare, lyric poetry, autobiography, and philosophy and literature.

Mark Maslan
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley
Associate Professor, English Department
Areas of interest include American literature, poetry and poetics, theories of gender and sexuality, Anglophone African literature, and post-colonial theory.

Ellen McCracken
Ph.D., University of California, San Diego
Professor, Spanish and Portuguese Department
Areas of interest include Contemporary Latin American literature; Latin American cultural studies; U.S. Latino literature; literary theory; visual and verbal semiotics; mass culture; and women’s writing. Ellen McCracken has published From Mademoiselle to Ms.: Decoding Women’s Magazines (St. Martin’s, 1993); New Latina Narrative: The Feminine Space of Postmodern Ethnicity (University of Arizona Press, 1999); Fray Angélico Chávez: Poet, Priest, Artist (University of New Mexico Press, 2000); Her work also includes articles on US Latina writers Cisneros, Ponce, Alvarez, Mohr, Limón; Latin American writers Cantú, Vargas Llosa, Cortázar, Puig, Leñero, and Piglia; visual and verbal semiosis in retablos; iconicity and narrative; popular religiosity; metaplagiarism; women and mass culture; the meta-comic book; and hybridity and the space of the border.

Catherine Nesci
Ph.D. in French and Comparative Literature, University of Paris-7; Agrégation, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris
Professor, French and Italian Department and Women’s Studies.
Areas of interest include nineteenth-century literature, cinema, Francophone women writers and directors, feminism, Balzac, literary theory, sociocriticism, and cultural and urban studies.

Christopher Newfield
Ph.D., Cornell University
Professor, English Department
Areas of interest include nineteenth and twentieth-century American literature, literary and social theory, and gender, sexuality, and race.

Michael O’Connell
Ph.D., Yale University
Professor Emeritus, English Department
Areas of interest include Renaissance literature, and Medieval and Renaissance drama.

Elide Valarini Oliver
Ph.D., University of San Paolo
Associate Professor, Spanish and Portuguese Department
Born in São Paulo, Brazil to an Italian family, Élide Valarini Oliver studied in a French school before entering the University of São Paulo where she studied Music and graduated in Letters (Portuguese, English and French). She is a poet and a translator with poems and articles published in various journals (Americas and Europe) and her fields of interest include Brazilian literature and culture, Comparative literature, Literary theory, Theory and practice of translation, History of ideas, History of Art and Music, Philosophy, Aesthetics, Art, Music, Musicology.

Carol Braun Pasternack
Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles
Associate Professor, English Department
Areas of interest include old and middle English literature, history of the English language, oral and textual history, and gender in the middle ages.

Giorgio Perissinotto
Ph.D., Columbia University
Professor Emeritus, Spanish and Portuguese Department
Hispanic linguistics: history of the language, dialectology, Mexican Spanish, California Spanish.

Sara Poot-Herrera
Ph.D., El Colegio de Mexico
Professor, Spanish and Portuguese Department
Specialization in Mexican and Spanish American Literature. She works above all on Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Mexican Culture, and Theater (XVII and XVIII century), women writers, and on contemporary romance and short stories (XXI Century Literature).

William Powell
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley
Associate Professor, East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies and Religious Studies
William Powell is an active member of two departments, Religious Studies and East Asian Languages and Cultures. He was trained in the philological methods of Buddhist studies, which was the basis for his translation and study of the prominent ninth century Chan (Zen) monk, Dong shan. This will be followed by a study of Dong shan’s disciple, Cao shan. His present work focuses on the relationship between Chinese Buddhism, pilgrimage and sacred space, particularly mountainous regions, placing emphasis on modes of spatial perception rooted in religious understandings, and the role of those modes of perception in economic, social, and ecological systems. This work has led to an involvement in digital simulations of sacred geography and topography, both as a means of scholarly analysis and as a pedagogic device for teaching about the relatively complex notions that emerge from such analysis at the undergraduate level.

Eric Prieto
Ph.D., New York University
Associate Professor, French and Italian Department
Areas of interest include twentieth-century literature, Francophone, music and literature, narrative poetics, and aesthetics.

Rita Raley
Ph.D., University of California
Associate Professor, English Department
Areas of interest include digital textuality, electronic culture, globalization and global culture, language theory and history, cultures of colonialism and imperialism, and history of the university.

Eduardo Raposo
Ph.D., University of Lisbon
Professor, Spanish Portuguese Department
Comparative Romance Grammar; Generative Syntax; Semantics; Spanish and Portuguese Linguistics.

Larry Rickels
Ph.D., Princeton University
Professor, Department of Germanic, Slavic and Semitic Studies
Areas of interest include the genealogy of media (of both occult mediums and media technologies), Freud, psychoanalytic theories, and the overlaps (for example in Frankfurt school of thought as in deconstruction) between psychoanalysis and various other critical discourses.

Mark Rose
Ph.D., Harvard University
Professor Emeritus, English Department
Areas of interest include Renaissance literature, dramatic and non-dramatic, Shakespeare, science fiction, and history and theory of intellectual property.

Katherine Saltzman-Li
Ph.D., Stanford University
Associate Professor and Undergraduate Advisor, East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies
With a Ph.D. from the Department of Asian Languages at Stanford University, Katherine Saltzman-Li studied Japanese literature and pre-modern performing arts with support from the Japanese Ministry of Education, Whiting Foundation, and Japan Foundation. Her teaching includes courses on pre-modern literature and drama, Japanese folklore, third-year level Japanese language, and Comparative Literature. Her research is on kabuki and the Medieval and early-Edo Period short prose fiction genre of otogizôshi. Her book, Creating Kabuki Plays: Context for Kezairoku, “Valuable Notes on Playwriting” examines kabuki play creation and playwrights through available contemporary sources. It also discusses interactions and intersections among various artistic groups of the latter half of the Edo Period. Saltzman-Li has also published translations of two early kabuki plays, the quintessential Edo-style piece “Shibaraku” and the puppet-derived “Sanemori Monogatari.” The translation of “Shibaraku” grew out of examinations into the self-introduction speeches known as tsurane which are an important feature of this play and about which she has published a study. Current research includes further study of tsurane, a study of yakugara (the role types of kabuki) and work on otogizôshi, among other ongoing projects.

Russell Samolsky
Ph.D., University of Colorado, Boulder
Associate Professor, English Department
Russell Samolsky’s research interests are situated at the convergence of postcolonial discourse, South African literature, modernism, and Jewish studies. He is currently working on a book entitled “Apocalyptic Futures: Inscribed Bodies and the Violence of the Text in Twentieth-Century Culture,” which examines the relationship between an apocalyptic text and a future catastrophic event.

Harvey Sharrer
Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles
Professor, Spanish and Portuguese Department
Areas of interest include Medieval Literature: Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan; Comparative Literature: Arthurian romance; and Catalan language and culture. Harvey Sharrer is Author of A Critical Bibliography of Hispanic Arthurian Material, I: Texts: The Prose Romance Cycles (London: Grant & Cutler, 1977); The Legendary History of Britain in Lope García de Salazar’s Libro de las bienandanzas e fortunas (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1979); editor with Frederick G. Williams of Studies on Jorge de Sena by His Colleagues and Friends (Santa Barbara: Jorge de Sena Center for Portuguese Studies, 1981); editor with E. Michael Gerli of Hispanic Medieval Studies in Honor of Samuel G. Armistead (Madison: Hispanic Seminary of Medieval Studies, 1992); compiler with Arthur L-F. Askins, Martha E. Schaffer, and Aida Fernanda Dias of BITAGAP (Bibliografia de Textos Antigos Galegos e Portugueses, part of CD-ROM PhiloBiblon: Electronic Bibliographies of Medieval Catalan, Galician, Portuguese, and Spanish Texts, general editors Arthur L-F. Askins, Harvey L. Sharrer, and Charles B. Faulhaber (Berkeley: The Bancroft Library, 1999); co-author with Manuel Pedro Ferreira of book in preparation Cantus Coronatus: Seven cantigas de amor by Dom Dinis, King of Portugal and the Algarve; author of numerous essays on Arthurian, Tristan, Alexander, sentimental romances, Galician-Portuguese poetry, pseudo-history and literatura de cordel.

Cynthia Skenazi
Doctorat en philosophie et lettres, Bruxelles; Ph.D., University of Michigan
Professor and Chair, French and Italian Department
Areas of interest include Renaissance literature and culture, and Belgian literature in French.

Jon Snyder
Ph.D., Yale University; M. Phil., Yale University
Professor and Chair, French and Italian Department
Areas of interest include Italian literature and comparative European literature, of the early modern and modern periods.

Sven Spieker
Ph.D., Oxford University
Associate Professor, Department of Germanic, Slavic and Semitic Studies
Areas of interest include East-Central European literatures, contemporary art (especially in the East-Central-European context), the theory and practice of the historical avant-gardes in East-Central Europe and the US, and the interplay of media, art, and critical theory.

Ernest Sturm
Attorney-at-Law. L.L.B., New York University School of Law; Ph.D. Columbia University
Professor, French and Italian Department
Areas of interest include eighteenth and twentieth-century literature, and philosophy of literature.

Ronald W. Tobin
Ph.D. Princeton University
Professor, French and Italian Department
Areas of interest include seventeenth-century literature, French classical theatre, and food in literature.

Candace Waid
Ph.D., Yale University
Associate Professor, English Department
Areas of interest include nineteenth and twentieth century American and African American Literature and Culture, and Native American Literatures.

William Warner
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University
Professor, English Department
Areas of interest include eighteenth-century British and American literature and cultural studies, history and theory of media, and digital culture.

Elisabeth Weber
Ph.D., Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
Professor and Chair, Department of Germanic, Slavic and Semitic Studies and Comparative Literature; Affiliated Professor, Religious Studies
Areas of interest include French philosophy and theory; psychoanalysis and trauma-studies; German Judaism of the nineteenth and twentieth-centuries; and nineteenth and twentieth-century German literature.

Simon Williams
Ph.D. in European Literature, University of East Anglia
Professor and Chair, Theater and Dance
Areas of interest include theatre history, dramatic literature, and the history of opera. He specializes in the European theatre of the eighteenth and nineteenth-centuries, but has also published in the field of Irish drama and in a variety of topics relating to the performance of opera. He is currently writing a history of Romantic acting and is converting a series of lectures he gave at the Bayreuth Festival into a book on Wagnerian music drama. He is also collaborating with colleagues from other universities to publish a history of world theatre. He recently directed the UCSB Opera Theatre in Benjamin Britten’s The Turn of the Screw (1998), Mozart’s La finta giardiniera (1999), Massenet’s Werther (2000), Humperdinck’s Hansel and Gretel (2002).

Kay Young
Ph.D., Harvard University
Associate Professor, English Department
Areas of interest include Victorian studies, the novel, Hollywood films of the ’30s and ’40s, the musical consciousness, narrative and philosophy, dance, music, and architecture.