May 27 — CLTC Annual Conference: Aesthetic Mutations

Posted in Conference on April 19th, 2011

CLTC’s annual graduate student conference will take place at Centennial House on Friday, May 27th, 2011 from 9 AM until 6 PM.

Graduate students from throughout the University of California system and from other universities will consider the discipline of aesthetics itself in relation to “change,” for the concepts and discourse of aesthetics have undergone a sweeping transformation from antiquity to (post)modernity, and they will also focus on the representation and thematization of “mutation” and “change” in artworks and media products of all kinds and from all periods.

Our keynote speakers are:

Professor Shane Butler, Classics Department, UCLA. Title of speech: “After-Images.” 9:30 AM
Professor Bram Ieven, Department of Modern Languages, Utrecht University (IHC Visiting Scholar at UCSB). Title of speech: “Transmutations of Modernism.” 4:45 PM

Detailed Schedule — or click on the “Conference” tab

Directions and details about location are available at Logistics, under the Conference tab.

Call for Papers for CLTC Spring Conference: Aesthetic Mutations — Friday May 27, 2011

Posted in Uncategorized on March 23rd, 2011

ANNOUNCING: AESTHETIC MUTATION(S)

The 8th ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE UC Santa Barbara CONSORTIUM FOR LITERATURE, THEORY AND CULTURE (CLTC)

27 May 2011

Call for Papers – Due Monday, April 4, 2011 to cltcucsb@gmail.com

The Consortium for Literature, Theory, and Culture, an interdisciplinary humanities research group at the University of California, Santa Barbara, is hosting the eighth annual CLTC graduate student conference on Friday, May 27th 2011. The conference keynote speaker is Shane Butler, Professor of Classics at UCLA.

The CLTC welcomes 250-word abstracts from all graduate students in the humanities, as well as 250-word proposals of exhibits and discussions from MFA students. This year’s CLTC conference focuses on interdisciplinary approaches to aesthetics in terms of mutation.


We seek papers that will consider the discipline of aesthetics itself in relation to “change,” for the concepts and discourse of aesthetics have undergone a sweeping transformation from antiquity to (post)modernity. We encourage the submission of papers examining shifts—historical, cultural, theoretical—in our understanding of such hotly contested terms as “art” and “beauty.” We call for papers concerning the representation and thematization of “mutation” and “change” in artworks and media products of all kinds and from all periods. We also want to invite papers that consider the mutations inherent in the physical and natural world, as well as in the ways through which we theorize the latter in relation to perceptions of the beautiful, the sublime, and so on.


Some examples of sites of aesthetic mutation our Consortium finds of interest:
Ex: Frankenstein – as a representation of a cultural tension over new scientific explorations at the time, and the shifting understanding of (and engagement with) science.
Ex: The interpretations of Plato’s aesthetics in modern or contemporary philosophy.
Ex: The alterations to genetic structures caused by exposure to nuclear fallout and radiation, the subsequent production of mutated organisms, and our perceptions or representations of these.
Ex: “Heroin chic” as a marketed aesthetic based on the progressive destruction of the body.
Ex: Uses of special effects, animation, or experimental film form (including sound) to explore the possibilities of representing bodies, sites, and subjectivities in cinema


Topics might include but are not limited to:
-mutations of our understanding of what is aesthetically pleasing
-mutations in the context of bios/life
-adaptation and translation
-theoretical considerations of questions of change
-changes in theoretical approaches to literature and culture
-new categories of aesthetics
-body modification
-deviations and changes from an established norm of beauty
-perversion
-plasticity
-conversion
-metamorphosis and digression
-genetic modifications
-the process of creating an image and/or the manipulation of that image
-landscaping– the manipulation of the natural to fit cultural aesthetic values
-the coming and passing of fashionable tends – how does a style go from pleasing to unbearable?
-aesthetic agendas: political mandates shaping art to reflect ideology
-reality and representation
-changing meanings of texts through circulation and reception
-complementary and contrapuntal uses of sound and image in audiovisual media
Please email 250 word abstracts of to cltcucsb@gmail.com by April 4, 2011.

Winter Colloquium Scheduled!

Posted in colloquia on February 7th, 2011

CLTC’s next roundtable will be held on Tuesday, February 15th, 2011, 6:00PM-8:00 PM, in South Hall 2617.

The presenters are:

Lan Xuan Le, Film & Media Studies: “Scanner Epistemologies”

Devin Fromm, Comparative Literature: “The Renewal of Mankind: Benjamin, Modernist Subjectivity, and the Techno-Human Beyond Itself”

James Conrad, Classics: “Misremembering History: Sallust’s Insecurities and Exempla in the Catilinarian Debate”

Abstracts are available under the colloquia tab, or by clicking here

CLTC co-sponsoring 2nd Translation Studies Symposium

Posted in Uncategorized on January 15th, 2011

TRANSLATION STUDIES SYMPOSIUM II:

THE TRANSLATIONAL PARADIGM

Monday February 14, 2011, IHC McCune room

This symposium marks the first anniversary of the Translation Studies
Doctoral Emphasis at UCSB. As Emily Apter observed in the recent MLA
Profession 2010, “In this time of economic downturn and the humanities’
consequent vulnerability, translation studies (and the  translational
paradigm) emerge as a workable rallying point.”   Translation engages
both national and cosmopolitan concerns, brings together diverse
interests, disciplines, and communities; translation crosses the divide
between literary practice and theory, Western and non-Western world
views, and is accessible to both academics and non-academics.  In our
second symposium we continue to explore the ways in which translation
studies opens up new avenues of research and pedagogy.

Program

1:30 Welcome, David Marshall

2-4 Panel 1, Dominique Jullien (UCSB), chair
David Bellos (Princeton University, French & Comparative Literature)
“The Myth of Literal Translation”
Eli Evans (UC Santa Barbara, Comparative Literature)
“Anabasis Without End: Javier Marías’ Tu rostro mañana and
‘translational’ narrative”
Jordan A. Yamaji Smith (UC Los Angeles, Comparative Literature)
“On Translationscapes: Institutional Ideology and the Permutations of
World Literature”
Michael Heim (UC Los Angeles, Slavic & Comparative Literature)
“Translation and Linguistic Ecology”

4:30-6 Panel 2, Round table: “Translation Practices: Implications for the Humanities”
-Suzanne Jill Levine, UCSB Spanish & Comparative Literature, moderator
-Efrain Kristal, UCLA, Spanish & Comparative Literature
-Romy Sutherland, UCLA, Film Studies & Comparative Literature
-John Nathan, UCSB, Japanese & Comparative Literature
-Michael Berry, UCSB, Chinese & Comparative Literature
-Jon Snyder, UCSB, Italian & Comparative Literature

6-7 Reception

Call for Papers: Winter 2011 Colloquium

Posted in Uncategorized on December 14th, 2010

CALL FOR PAPERS! — Deadline Extended

Winter 2011 Graduate Student Roundtable : Tuesday, February 15th, 2011, South Hall 2617

Deadline for Abstract Submissions — EXTENDED: January 14th, 2011 (end of second week of classes).

If your abstract is selected, please be prepared to submit your paper or presentation for review by the CLTC board by January 28th.

The CLTC Theme this year is “Aesthetic Mutations,” and we are seeking papers on related research or projects that pertain to the intersections between literature or other media forms, critical theory, and other cultural objects and practices. Applicants should plan for a twenty-minute presentation (usually around 8-9 pages), followed by ten minutes of discussion. This colloquium presents an excellent opportunity for graduate students in the humanities to practice delivering conference papers in a relaxed, constructive, and amicable environment. Presenters are subsequently eligible to apply for CLTC travel grants to help defray the costs of participating in national conferences.

Submissions should include the following:

1.) Name, department, and level (1st year, 2nd, ABD etc.)

2.) Approximately 300 word abstract of paper.

Please send submissions to msatris@umail.ucsb.edu with CLTC WINTER COLLOQUIUM in the subject line by January 14th, 2011.

Fall Colloquium– 6 PM on 11/16 in TD 2517

Posted in Uncategorized on November 14th, 2010
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Fall 2010 Graduate Student Colloquium

Presenters
Steven Malcic, Department of Film and Media Studies
“Behind the Blue Pill: ED Drugs and the American Pornotopia”
 
Megan Fernandes, Department of English
“The Disintegrating Subject: Consciousness, Cognition, and Affect in Beckett’s Molloy
 
William Yankes, Latin American and Iberian Studies Program
“José Lezama Lima: An Approximation to a Mystical Aesthetic”

6 PM @ the Theater and Dance Building, Room 2517
~~refreshments served~~

Abstracts are available under the Colloquia tab.

CFP! Fall 2010 Colloquium

Posted in Uncategorized on October 11th, 2010
Tags:

Attention UCSB Humanities Graduate Students:

CALL FOR PAPERS

Consortium for Literature, Theory, and Culture

Fall 2010 Graduate Student Roundtable : Tuesday, November 16th, 2010, Seminar Room, Theater and Dance Building (TD 2517)

Deadline for Submissions: Nov 2, 2010

The CLTC Theme this year is “Aesthetic Mutations,” and we are seeking papers on related research or projects that pertain to the intersections between literature or other media forms, critical theory, and other cultural objects and practices. Applicants should plan for a twenty-minute presentation (usually around 8-9 pages), followed by ten minutes of discussion. This colloquium presents an excellent opportunity for graduate students in the humanities to practice delivering conference papers in a relaxed, constructive, and amicable environment. Presenters are subsequently eligible to apply for CLTC travel grants to help defray the costs of participating in national conferences.

Submissions should include the following:

1.) Name, department, and level (1st year, 2nd, ABD etc.)

2.) Approximately 300 word abstract of proposal

Please send submissions to msatris@umail.ucsb.edu with CLTC FALL COLLOQUIUM in the subject line.

*Celebrity and Glamour*

Posted in Uncategorized on March 9th, 2010

Please join us at the upcoming CLTC graduate student conference:

Friday, May 21st, 2010
University of California, Santa Barbara

“Celebrity is the advantage of being known to people who we don’t know, and who don’t know us.” — Nicolas de Chamfort

What does it mean to think about ‘celebrity’ and ‘glamour’ in the contemporary moment? What are the parameters of these two concepts? What is the relationship between celebrity and glamour? Is contemporary celebrity distinct from ‘celebrity’ in previous historical moments and cultural contexts, ranging from ancient Greece to Renaissance Italy, from the Romantics to the Russian Revolution? Can we speak of political celebrity? Literary, artistic or intellectual celebrity? How do these concepts traverse political, national, economic, and cultural terrains in producing new configurations of desires and imaginaries? How are Western/American discourses and images of celebrity and glamour exported and circulated throughout the global media economy? How do non-Western audiences and culture-makers absorb and/or contest these memes from inside or outside of that same economy? With the huge worldwide user-base of YouTube, Twitter and other social networking and media sharing platforms, the economic travails of older media (publishing, Hollywood, etc.), the increasing ubiquity of ‘reality’ television programming, the popularity of do-it-yourself celebrity gossip blogs, and do-it-yourself viral video stardom, we seem to have reached a moment in which obscurity and celebrity are unstable notions whose dynamic relationship demands further inquiry.Both celebrity and glamour–past and present–are in need of interrogation in relation to the ongoing discourses concerning representation, theory, networks, the body, gender, power, community and so on.

It is with this in mind that the Consortium for Literature, Theory and Culture at the University of California, Santa Barbara has chosen *Celebrity and Glamour* as the themes of this year’s CLTC conference, which seeks interventions from graduate student scholars around California that consider these notions in historical, literary, cultural, or aesthetic terms.

The conference will be held at the UCSB Centennial House on May 21st, 2010.
The CLTC is proud to welcome two distinguished keynote speakers to this event: Professor of English at the University of California Santa Barbara Bishnupriya Ghosh and Associate Professor of Journalism and Communication at the University of Southern California, Josh Kun.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Call for papers: Fall round table

Posted in Uncategorized on October 8th, 2009

Each quarter, the Consortium for Literature, Theory and Culture sponsors one
or two round table discussion groups in which graduate students and
faculty meet to present and discuss papers.  Papers presented during these meetings are usually in final draft form, and will be either presented at a
national conference or at the CLTC’s own annual graduate student conference
held on campus in the Spring of every year.  In order to apply
for CLTC travel grants, graduate students must first present their work at a round table discussion.

This year’s CLTC theme is “Celebrity and glamour” (see website for further information).  Following that theme,  the first round table discussion group is scheduled for Tuesday, November 10th. Details on location and time to follow. We are calling for 250-word abstracts for papers on celebrity, broadly interpreted, in any culture, period, area, or humanistic field. Please send abstracts to Allison Schifani at aschifani(at)umail.ucsb.edu by October 31st, 2009.

Paper topics may include but are not limited to: stardom; fame; glamour;
distraction; ’15 minutes’; new models of public visibility; visuality and
visual culture; celebrity in history; alternative constructions of
celebrity; culturally specific celebrity; virtuosity; obscurity;
relationships between technology and celebrity; political celebrity; fandom; infamy; etc.

Please direct any questions to: aschifani(at)umail.ucsb.edu

Spring Conference: *Risk* May 29, 2009

Posted in Uncategorized on May 18th, 2009

**RISK!**

In a vast spectrum of human undertakings, perceptions, situations and experiences, risk is fundamental to our calculations of chance, probability or odds that bear on the future. Risk may or may not be reckless, but only “a relation of risk,” Heidegger states, “places human beings, and them alone, in the open site in the midst of beings.”

Friday May 29th Scheduled Program:

9:00a - Greeting and Opening Remarks: Professor Jon Snyder, French and Italian Department, UCSB

9:15a - Introduction of Professor Wolf Kittler by Erik Eppel

9:20a - Keynote One: Professor Wolf Kittler, Germanic Studies/Comparative Literature, UCSB

“Risk, History, Trauma”

10:00a - Panel One: Modernity, Movements, Mafia, and Marivaux moderated by Marthine Satris

1) Carlos Lin (Comp Lit, University of Southern California)

“The Problem of Modernity: Rethinking Bodies, Sexualities, and Modernizations”

2) Marzia Milazzo (Comp Lit, UC Santa Barbara)

“We Risk our Lives to Save our Dignity: The Youth-led Anti-Mafia Movement in Sicily”

3) Kane Anderson (Theater and Dance, UC Santa Barbara)

“The Rise of Super-Obama and the Risks of Pop Culture on Public Identity”

4) Anneleise Pollock (French and Italian, UC Santa Barbara)

“Chance, Risk, and Reward in Marivaux’s The Upstart Peasant

11:20-11:30a - Coffee Break

11:30a - Panel Two: Chromatic and Other Configurations of the Political moderated by Dan Reynolds

1) Yuting Huang (Comp Lit, UC Los Angeles)

“The Unknowable Risk – The Concept of Risk and the Ethics of Political Action”

2) Dana Solomon (English, UC Santa Barbara)

“The Constant Threat: Color-Coding the Politicization of Risk”

3) Rahul Mukherjee (Film and Media StudiesUC Santa Barbara)

“A Reply to Terrorism on a Wednesday : Bollywood Thriller’s Prescriptions for State and                                      Citizens”

12:45p - Lunch (catered)


1:45p – Introduction to Professor Didier Maleuvre by David Platzer


2:00p  - Keynote Two: Professor Didier Maleuvre, French/Comparative Literature, UCSB

“Risk and Creation”

2:45p - Panel Three: War, Identity, Chance: Fires moderated by Karin Kroger

1) Emma Beaufort (Comparative Literature UC Santa Barbara)

“Risky Business: Psychological Warfare in Caribbean Households, 17th-18th Centuries”

2) Michelle Kendall (French and Italian, UC Santa Barbara)

“The Risk of Identity in Edouard Glissant”

3) Bret Brinkman (English, UC Santa Barbara)

“Risky Situations: Chance Encounters, Waste, and Space”

4.) Chris Lee (Comparative Literature, UC Santa Barbara)

“The Greatest Fire: Strindberg, Ibsen, Ghosts”


4:15p - Concluding Remarks /Roundtable (Or, Monopoly versus Risk Showdown, TBA)

CLTC Faculty Advisor: Professor Jon Snyder